Monthly Archives: May 2014

Artifacts of history?

Recently, Sudan’s courts sentenced a Christian woman to death for refusing to abandon her faith. She was granted a delay while she gave birth, but she is still under sentence of death for “apostasy” , which in this case means … Continue reading

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Even in the worst possible situation, there are always people who ask, “How can I help?”

Recently, I reread something Fred Rogers, of “Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood”, once said. He recalled that one of his grandparents told him when he seemed to despair in the face of terrible tragedies that he should look for the helpers, for … Continue reading

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Faces

In the United States, a federal holiday that affects religious practice and is affected by that same practice is Memorial Day. Yesterday was Memorial Day and there were many public observances of Memorializing those who were killed while serving in … Continue reading

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Work Ethic

It has been recorded that Americans take the least amount of vacation among the industrialized countries. The last average amount was less than 2 weeks per year. We Americans seem to be oriented towards our jobs. The measure of prosperity … Continue reading

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Applying insight to the public square and through the public sector

Today, I have a question, but first I want to share something from the Buddhist teacher, Thich Nhat Hanh that I read this morning. He said: “When another person makes you suffer, it is because he suffers deeply within himself, … Continue reading

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Why religion needs government

As faiths intersect the public sector, (governments), we sometimes have the impression that religion is anti-government or that religious people are anti-government. And, it is true that many individuals have a deep suspicion of their governments. But, the truth is … Continue reading

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Setting the terms of the argument on religious freedon in the public sector

Hadley Arkes is the Ney professor of jurisprudence at Amherst College. He has written an article in the journal, “First Things” entitled, “Recasting Religious Freedom”. Arkes has made some important legal observations about the current arguments involving the religious who … Continue reading

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